January 26, 2020

NCC’s Nursing Program: Do you have what it takes?

“Blood, sweat and tears.”

That’s the insight of Stephen Quigley, NCC nursing major, on what it takes to get into one of the nation’s leading community colleges nursing programs. 

“To be a nursing major the requirements aren’t too bad,” explained Quigley. Students have to have a 3.0 or higher, a B or better in both AP 1 and 2. They must take an entrance exam called the ATI TEAS, and earn a score of proficient or better to be even considered for the program. Students must attend a mandatory nursing info session meeting as well.

 “Of course, transcripts and all that need to be in. It is recommended that you complete all pre-requisite classes, (everything besides the 7 nursing classes) before applying to the program,” explained Quigley. Since the program is so intense, it is recommended that students shouldn’t be taking other classes with nursing classes. 

“It’s competitive getting into the program. Almost 500+ people apply to the RN program and only 45 people get in each semester,” boasted Quigley. Once you are accepted, you secure your spot in the program by paying 200 dollars from your tuition. 

“Then comes the tedious work,” laughed Quigley. “You have to get 3 back ground checks (state, criminal history, and child abuse) and upload them to a site we use, called “my record tracker”, explained Quigley. Then students must upload everything, such as immunization records, basic life support certification records, and urine drug screenings. This process can take weeks or even months to complete, “especially the background checks and the immunizations.”

“The program is extremely intense”, explained Quigley. One class in worth 8 credits and it includes; 2-hour lectures twice a week, a 4-hour lab once a week and an 8-hour clinical day once a week, which requires students to spend the day at the assigned hospital and work with the nurses.

Regarding grades, “anything below a 78 is an F,” said Quigley. 

“But, in your first semester you’ll learn how to provide AM care to patients, give oral medications, injections, insert a catheter, hang an IV and more!” explained Quigley. “Studying and making time for your outside life is hard at times, but school has to come first in this program,” said Quigley. 

The hardest part of the program is time management, there is so much to be done and it all has to be done quickly, he said. “This program is phenomenal, because it is so highly accredited. NCC has an amazing reputation,” explained Quigley. “Even 4 nurses I work with at LVHN are graduates of NCC and they are amazing,” said Quigley. “The knowledge of nursing 101 in itself is mind blowing,” he explained. 

In the program not only do students make friends. But they make friends who, “they’ll be working, studying and sometimes crying with for 2 years,” explained Quigley.

“You learn how to care for patients and their different sicknesses. You learn how to do it in the most compassionate and caring way, said Quigley. 

They also learn to be amazing nurses.

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