Menu

Watching your Glass

Google co-founder Sergey Brin shows off the company's high-tech eye wear.

The new product Google Glass could be the next way to connect with other people and the technological world.

Google co-founder Sergey Brin shows off the company's high-tech eye wear.
Google co-founder Sergey Brin shows off the company’s high-tech eye wear.

Project Glass, as it is referred to by Google personnel, has gathered lots of buzz on social media, with about 15 million views on the YouTube video released in late February.

Another promotional video released in April 2012 has a futuristic feel to it.

This video is shown from the point of view of a man communicating hands-free with his friends. Then it shows turn-by-urn directions from the point of view of the man while he walks to a local bookstore.

Google expects to ship its Explorer Edition of Glass this month to early testers, ABC News reports. The cost is $1,500.

Glass is essentially a pair of glasses with the accessibility of a home computer, a high-definition camera and face-recognition software.

It allows consumers to view Internet information or even driving directions through a small screen in the top corner of their line of vision while looking forward.

Asked about the product, most NCC students were enthusiastic.

Craig Cressman said he was excited for the product because he was “tired of people looking down in their laps at their smartphones” and that he believes Glass would stop that.

In a conference called Ted talk, Google co-founder and Project Glass creator Sergey Brin, agreed with Cressman. “You’re actually socially isolating yourself with your phone, I feel like it’s kind of emasculating,” Brin said. “You’re standing there just rubbing this featureless piece of glass.”

The Glass creator said that he wants to keep people in the moment by interlocking the time taken to do things with a phone and actively participating in an event like a conference.

Not everybody thinks Project Glass will be a positive step forward for communication.

Political Science professor Vasiliki Anastasakos is not sold on how personal Glass is. “People are not happy about being put on camera now,” she said “How will people react when they have no idea if they are being filmed or analyzed by another individual through an Internet server?”

Google plans to make a consumer version of Glass available for sale by year’s end, ABC News said.